The House on the Strand

The House on the Strand

Book - 1969
Average Rating:
6
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Publisher: Garden City, N.Y. : Doubleday, c1969
Characteristics: 308 pages, 1 leaf of plates : genealogical table, map (on lining paper) ; 22 cm

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WhidbeyIslander
Aug 10, 2017

After fighting my way through Rebecca, this author wasn't on the top of my 'must-read' list. But for whatever reason I tried The House on the Strand, I am grateful. An interesting story well told that wraps you up and carries you along.

d
DorisWaggoner
Mar 20, 2015

This is at least the third time I've read this book, and I think it's my favorite Du Maurier. Writing was a drug to her, and Cornwall and lots of research were great passions. All these join in the novel. Some of the "science" is hokey, 45 years on. As a history buff, I too wanted to know who the people were that Richard, the narrator, visited when he went into the past, and could on some level understand why they were so real to him. The doctor thought they were hallucinations, but there was proof satisfactory to Richard that the people really existed, 600 years before--they were listed in books, etc. Ironically, the last book I read was Dan Jones' "The Plantagenets," and some of this plot revolves around a rebellion I'd just read about. Very interesting to read how it affected "real" people, from the lower orders to country gentry. It lost a star for the hokey science, though in a way that's the trouble with time travel. It's a bit difficult to really account for it, but the resulting stories can be wonderful. This one definitely makes a great read.

bergieskid Jul 19, 2013

Better than Rebecca.
A book to savor.

Krajzel Jun 15, 2012

I haven't read a Daphne Du Maurier book in quite a number of years, ever since Rebecca. This book was great, grabbed my attention from the first page and right unto the last page. Highly recommended for a quick, clean read, no bad language, no bloody scenes. Highly entertaining, a breath of fresh air.

j
Janice21383
Apr 10, 2012

"All we are, and all we seem, is but a dream within a dream..." A man in an isolated house sees visions from six hundred years before. Ms. Du Maurier does not stoop to explain how or why. It just is, and it's beautiful.

l
lpreston214
Feb 21, 2012

Intriguing time-travel story where the traveller does not move in location, only in what he perceives. So as the main character moves around following people he sees from the 14th century, he may be crossing 20th century roads and risks being run over etc. Also, the 14th century people can't see him. He is just an observer (removes the "changing the past" paradox nicely). Good read, my only complaint being it's hard to keep the characters and their relationships straight--even with the family tree in the front of the book. Among the 24 characters from the 14th century, there are only 14 distinct first names.

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