The President and the Apprentice

The President and the Apprentice

Eisenhower and Nixon, 1952-1961

Book - 2015
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More than half a century after Eisenhower left office, the history of his presidency is so clouded by myth, partisanship, and outright fraud that most people have little understanding of how Ike's administration worked or what it accomplished. We know-or think we know-that Eisenhower distrusted his vice president, Richard Nixon, and kept him at arm's length; that he did little to advance civil rights; that he sat by as Joseph McCarthy's reckless anticommunist campaign threatened to wreck his administration; and that he planned the disastrous 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba. None of this is true. This book reveals a different Eisenhower, and a different Nixon. Ike trusted and relied on Nixon, sending him on many sensitive overseas missions. Eisenhower, not Truman, desegregated the military. Eisenhower and Nixon, not Lyndon Johnson, pushed the Civil Rights Act of 1957 through the Senate. Eisenhower was determined to bring down McCarthy and did so.
Publisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, [2015]
Copyright Date: ©2015
ISBN: 9780300181050
0300181051
Characteristics: xviii, 791 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm
Alternative Title: Eisenhower and Nixon, 1952-1961

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PimaLib_NormS Dec 14, 2016

“The President and the Apprentice: Eisenhower and Nixon, 1952-1961” by Irwin F. Gellman is, well, actually I’m not sure what to make of it. Full disclosure: I have been a Nixon hater for many, many years. Yet, I continue to read book after book about him. Like him or not, I find Richard Nixon to be endlessly fascinating. So, when I saw this book about the relationship between President Eisenhower and his VP “Dick” Nixon, I thought it might be interesting. It was, but not how I thought it would be. This book claims to set the record straight regarding the true nature of the dynamic between these two quite different men. It has been generally accepted that Ike did not think much of his VP and that Nixon was desperate to prove himself worthy of Eisenhower’s respect. Gellman disputes this. He states that Ike had great respect for Nixon’s intellect and judgment, giving him a very important role in the Eisenhower administration. (Interestingly, after Nixon became President, he showed very little respect or confidence in his VP, Spiro Agnew, giving him next to nothing to do.) Gellman backs up his conclusions with more than one hundred fifty pages of notes from his extensive research. “The President and the Apprentice” did not change my opinion of Richard Nixon, but it is good to read or listen to a different point of view once in a while.

s
StarGladiator
Jul 26, 2015

An accurate quote from Publishers Weekly critic: //Gellman credits Ike with ending Joseph McCarthy's anti-communist reign of terror \\ Very little truth in this book, absolute tripe and revisionistic nonsense! What ended McCarthy was when he went after a top member of the Business Advisory Council [today renamed the Business Council and still as powerful]. Do some real research on Eisenhower and you find [and yes, the Bay of Pigs invasion was planned in Ike's administration] the overthrow of [capitalist, not communist] Arbenz of Guatemala, because he was seeking to create a middle class there, and Floyd Odlum, Ike's financial supporter, was also the major investor in United Fruit at that time - - that the lawsuit against the Wall Street 17, initiated in FDR's administration, was fraudulently ended in Ike's tenure - - the failed overthrow of nonaligned Sukarno of Indonesia, costing thousands of Indonesian lives, the overthrow of democratically-elected president of Iran, to steal their oil - - the compromising of Ex-Im Bank by Ike-appointee, Nelson Rockefeller, plus Rockefeller's involvement in the structuring of the Department of Defense - - and many other negative actions and activities.

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