A teenage boy wakes up at a train station with no memory of who he is. His only clue is a copy of Walden. He heads to Walden Pond in hopes that he can figure out his identity. Gripping. I also appreciated how subtle the author kept the book’s gritty realism. The amount of bad or horrific things in this book are par for the YA course, yet the author does a graceful job of implying and not giving us detail overload as so many YA authors do. Also, the ending has a sweetness and innocence that I rarely find in kid’s fiction. Overall, it’s no better quality than most of the books I’ve read this summer, but it stands out in a good way based on its tone.

DanceFiddler's rating:
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